Tag Archives: short story collection

Matthew Pitt to Publish With Queen’s Ferry

Queen’s Ferry Press is pleased to announce its newest author, Matthew Pitt. These Are Our Demands, Matthew’s second collection, will be published in 2017. The twelve stories (and one artist’s sketch) revolve around characters laying claim to opportunities they wield little to no leverage to enforce. Their lack of power could be due to age; or because they hail from parts of the nation—such as a triptych of stories set in the Mississippi Delta—where merely getting by passes for rousing success; or due to language and cultural barriers; or shifting family dynamics that leave them lacking security. But being consigned to the margins opens up, for these characters, a different kind of wilderness, just across the border from polite society.

Stories from the collection have appeared in Conjunctions, Michigan Quarterly Review, Cimarron Review, Southern Humanities Review, The Chattahoochee Review, Epoch, Cincinnati Review, New South, New Letters, and Good Men Project, and have been honored and recognized by Best American Short Stories 2012, Glimmer Train and The Texas Observer.

Matthew’s first book of stories, Attention Please Now, won the Autumn House Press Fiction Prize. The collection was later a winner of Late Night Library’s Debutlitzer Prize and a Writers’ League of Texas Book Award finalist. Matthew’s fiction has appeared in dozens of magazines, anthologies, and print and online journals and several individual stories have been cited in “Best Of” anthologies; his fiction has also received honors and awards from The New York Times, Mississippi Arts Commission, Bronx Council on the Arts, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Salem College Center for Women Writers, and fellowships from the Bread Loaf, Sewanee, and Taos Writers’ Conferences. He has taught creative writing at NYU, Penn State-Altoona, Illinois College, and Hendrix College, and is Associate Editor of Bucknell University’s literary journal, West Branch. Matthew is currently an Assistant Professor of English at TCU in Fort Worth, where he serves as Editor of descant, and was recently recognized as the department’s Teacher of the Year.

MatthewPitt.AuthorImage

About publishing with Queen’s Ferry, Matthew says: “It’s human nature to take notice of, and interest in, your neighbors, and since Queen’s Ferry Press is more-or-less based out of my backyard, I’ve been a witness to the impressive momentum they’ve built, and their clear commitment to literary work—and short stories, in particular. They publish beautiful books, driven by language and character, books eager to push form and approach in electric ways, and I kept noticing their books were penned by writers I admire, whose work spikes my heartbeat and inspires me. I am delighted and proud to be part of that roster.”

Thanks for the kind words, Matthew–we’re thrilled to have you!

ADULTEROUS GENERATION Releases Today!

Pamela Painter (Wouldn’t You Like to Know) says of Adulterous Generation‘s characters:  “[They] never shy away from ‘doing.’ They consign dishes and wineglasses to the trash, flood houses, break taboos, plunder lives for a comic strip, steal money with mace as a weapon, and navigate the mayhem of their own lives with humor, wisdom, and hope in their quirky and profoundly generous hearts.”

Today marks the release of Amy L. Clark’s collection of short stories, twenty in all; the book can be ordered directly through QFP and is also available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Ebook formats are also downloadable, though we feel the cover image especially sings on the paperback–something Amy is kind enough to talk about:

photocreditAmyLClarkdpi400

It is not an accident that the photograph featured on the cover of Adulterous Generation was taken in the parking lot of a 7-Eleven.  And not just any 7-Eleven.  The 7-Eleven.  The 7-Eleven because it was the only 7-Eleven I knew of growing up.  I grew up in a series of very small towns.  By the time I was in high school, I spent a great deal of time in the parking lot of the 7-Eleven.  I was there uncounted afternoons eating twenty-five cent Zebra Cakes and leaning against crappy cars.  I was there on the way to the prom with my hair in ringlets done up by my best friend’s mom.  I was there the night a giant luna moth flew in through the open door and so terrified the cashier that he hid in the back while a few of my more adventurous friends, those who were less cowed by the law or moral ambiguity, loaded candy bars and packs of Marlboro reds into their pockets and fled.  I was at work in the Dunkin Donuts next door when I called the cops to report that an old dude dressed in a Civil War uniform (Union) was parading around the 7-Eleven parking lot with a real rifle over his shoulder.  I was there the day this photograph was taken.  I took it with my stepfather’s old Nikkormat 35 millimeter.  Later, at the local art college where I was a student in the Saturday program for misfit high school students, I developed the film and printed the photograph on 8 x 10 matte paper.

The picture is of my best friend and her then-boyfriend.  It was the summer of 1996, and we were sixteen, and he was probably eighteen.  Somewhere just out of frame there would have been the car we were riding around in that day–his Duster or her father’s one-ton flatbed.  Somewhere just out of frame would have been a bottle of Mountain Dew and a couple packs of Camel Lights.

My best friend then is still one of my best friends now.  We’ve known each other for twenty-three years and have helped each other grow up.  Her then-boyfriend, on the other hand, has disappeared from the picture for me, and for her.  No idea what happened to him.  That 7-Eleven is no longer a 7-Eleven either.  That’s a bit like how I think of these stories–full of things many of us have experienced and some of us, and some of the characters, will grow out of.  Others will simply lose the plot, or the plot will lose them.  The bulk of these stories take place in locations similar to this parking lot, in or around that time period, which from here seems like a very long time ago.  And thank god.

FridayReads: On a Book Colliding with the World

This Friday, Zach VandeZande is reading a book well-suited to tin cans. His collection of fiction, Lesser American Boys, is forthcoming from Queen’s Ferry Press in November, 2016.

I like reading heart-wreckers on airplanes. There’s something about the captive space, the recirculated air, the general aura of melancholic resignation inside an airplane cabin that makes reading something deeply human that much more profound.  Everyone on an airplane has a Kafkaesque story of what got them to right where they are, rocketing through the sky at hundreds of miles an hour while (hopefully) trying their best not to fart.  Everyone feels a little self-conscious and silly, and more than a few of them, if they’re like me, feel profoundly alone.

I spent the last week traveling to a wedding and then to a last-minute job interview.  I had two books on my tablet, one for each plane ride that I planned on taking: Nicole Walker’s hybrid eco-crit memoir Quench Your Thirst with Salt, and Abigail Thomas’ What Comes Next and How to Like It.  I’ve been on a nonfiction kick, and both books were excellent.  But that’s not what I’m writing about.

What I’m writing about is this: I found myself headed home on an overnighter after having to book a flight at the last minute (like, I-bought-this-plane-ticket-in-a-bar last minute).  There was nothing left to read on my tablet, and the doors were about to close, and then I remembered that it was Tuesday, and Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me had just come out. I managed to get it bought and downloaded a few minutes before the flight attendants told us to put our stuff into airplane mode.

I am probably not the first to tell you that the book is necessary, an instant classic (and yes, there’s some irony there, given that it arrived on the same day as Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, which by all accounts appears to be a frustrating dud).  The basic structure of the book is a letter to Coates’ son, a response to the boy’s heartbreak on finding out that Mike Brown’s killers would go unpunished.  Coates tells his son of the danger of living in a world that destroys the lives of black people in order to sustain the Dream of its Whiteness, that clings to an ideal of equality without admitting that the bricks of that world are made of the dead bodies of slaves who didn’t ask to die for the glory of this country.  He tells his boy that his body is going to be taken from him, that there’s no stopping its coming. He tells his boy of Prince Jones, a college friend who was killed by a police officer for little reason. He tells his boy a lot of things, and in so doing tells the world of itself. So: a heart-wrecker, through and through.

I read it in one desperate gulp, which is fitting, as the book feels like a long insuck of air after too long underwater. I could leave it at that—an important book, read all at once—except there was a moment of interruption that is worth talking about.  While the book was doing its work on me, a young black woman was sitting to my right.  She seemed about nineteen, and was the kind of self-involved teenager that keeps baby boomers up at night.  She recorded, discarded, and re-recorded a Snapchat to her boyfriend while the plane was taking off and then got rude with the flight attendant about it.  She fidgeted relentlessly in the chair.  She kept getting her bag out and putting it away again, jabbing me in the side in the process.  Most of all, she made me self-conscious about what I was reading, which was a complicated thing to feel, and she got a little nosy in side-eying what I was up to, and then she leaned over and asked me about the book.

I had no idea what to say.  I thought to myself You, Zach VandeZande, who are listening to Vince Staples and reading Ta-Nehisi Coates.  You, the guy who just gave a talk about the possibility of true empathy in art.  This book is about you and your complicity in a violence so grand that you are just now beginning to comprehend it.  Because what was my answer going to be if not that, and what right did I have to give one to her, who I’d been annoyed by and wasn’t interested in connecting with and etc?  In the moment I said, “It’s a letter to his son.  It’s sort of about Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown.”  But that’s no good.  That’s a nothing answer, a half-ass thumbnail blurb for this enormous, grief-stricken thing that Coates was doing to me.

She asked how much I’d read, and I said about 2/3rds.  And she said it must be good then, and she wanted to write it down in her phone to look up later.  So I told her the title.  Looking back, I sort of wish I’d just given it to her, the whole tablet and everything.  I wish I’d had the courage to keep talking to her about it, to say, “Actually, it’s about you and me, and how we’re so far apart from each other, and how I’m not doing enough to close that gap.  How the shit I take for granted about my life came in no small part by people like me standing on your back, and Coates’ back, and soon enough his boy’s.”  But I let her sit there without speaking again and I let her fidget and I grew annoyed by her again until she got off at LAX.  And that’s who I am, and now I’ve gotta live with it.

There’s an old bit of wisdom I like, even though it comes from a terrible punk song by Dillinger Four: “Don’t let your comfort get the best of you.”  That’s what’s happened for white people in this country, and that’s what I hope we wake up from.  In that moment on that airplane I felt indictment, and I think that moments of indictment offer us a choice: we can face it head on and listen, taking the blows we deserve, or we can gather around the people who are like us and echo chamber each other into feeling good again.  I hope that the former happens with Coates’ book.  I’m skeptical that it will, but I hope.

Zach VandeZande
Zach VandeZande

Zach VandeZande spent too much of his life in Houston, TX, not enough of his life in Denton, TX, and now lives in Carrboro, NC with his girlfriend. He is the author of Apathy and Paying Rent and the co-editor of Critical Pedagogy and Global Literature: Worldly Teaching, and his work has appeared or will soon appear in Portland Review, Passages North, Atlas Review, Gettysburg Review, Cutbank, Thin Air, The Boiler, and elsewhere. He holds a PhD of fiction from the University of North Texas. He likes baking bread, hammocks, and people who bring their dogs.

On the Edges of Vision Tour Kickstarter – Live through August 15!

On The Edges of Vision
On The Edges of Vision

The idea to launch a Kickstarter project to help fund the On the Edges of Vision tour came about as a result of me talking aloud about my thoughts on Twitter. It seems often to be the case that when I clap my hands to the keyboard to work something out, there are dozens of wonderful writerly people with advice, caution and encouragement to give. Sometimes it’s advice about cakes or language or the best place to go to find moorland in the lowlands (long story).

I had such a positive response to the idea of the Kickstarter that I decided I had to at least try. Queen’s Ferry Press have beyond risen to the occasion, providing perks for donations, an editorial eye over suggested rewards and tonnes of support generally for the whole tour endeavour, something that has seemed at times like stepping out across an invisible bridge and hoping to stay airborne.  So far, the whole process has gone incredibly well. My goal is small, realistic. Just £1000 to defray costs, with money raised beyond that gratefully received to help me book more stops, more bus tickets, to shore a future reading tour through the UK or beyond. In response to missives on Facebook and Twitter, more readings have already appeared on the schedule. My heartfelt thanks to the network of writers, editors and booksellers who have taken a chance on this book and agreed to be a part of this. To host me in their cities, most of which I’ve never even been to. Raising my glass to the internet for making these little hales and cries possible at all. To my friend A, who helped make the video, putting up with my desire for romantic ruins and my hesitancy, and voice – which he had to listen to many times in the editing process. To D, for being the sound man (as he always is, every single day). To all the friends new-made or long loved who have put their backs into this.

My very first book, these stories of monsters and connection, will be available for pre-order on the 21st of July, and the tour begins on the 24th of August. A litany so far: Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, DC, New York. If I can see you, somewhere here, as I read to you, or after, as I sign your name and smile (awkwardly, but sincerely, as I do most things), it would be wonderful. Reach out. Tell me I’m here, tell me I made it. Tell me your favourite book, the best spot in this city.

What this will do for the book itself cannot be easily quantified. How many more readers will get to know On the Edges of Vision than would have done otherwise? How many more people will buy a copy? Come to a reading, ask me to sign? Not sure. But I can feel that they will be there, the readers. That sensation of connecting, or the possibility of this. A sensation of the finest threads vibrating.

If you’d like, support the Kickstarter here. The fundraiser ends at midnight, August 15th.


 

Helen McClory
Helen McClory

Helen McClory is a writer from Scotland. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Glasgow and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of New South Wales. There is a moor and a cold sea in her heart. This is her first collection.

Pop-Up Paperback!

Eighteen months after its hardcover release, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History re-emerges as a paperback. Featuring an additional chapter, “The Marriage of Elizabeth I and Ivan the Terrible,” and an alternate epilogue, “The Department of Disinformation,” Phong Nguyen proves that history does indeed repeat itself.

Buyers of the hardcover who include their original order number with their paperback order directly through Queen’s Ferry Press will receive this title at only $12.95 and pay nothing for shipping, while new readers will receive free shipping on their standard $16.95-priced copy. This re-release is available to ship on 28th July, 2015.

Snag your copy and discover all the almosts that have made (and remade) history.

Textbook-Cover

POOL PARTY TRAP LOOP: Now On Sale!

Pool Party Trap Loop
Pool Party Trap Loop

Ben Segal’s collection of stories Pool Party Trap Loop is now available via the Queen’s Ferry Press catalog, and wherever our books are sold!

Gary Lutz (Stories in the Worst Way) says “Pool Party Trap Loop‘s expertly miniaturized fictions of bodily havoc, of messily human collision, introduce Ben Segal as a vital and original voice.”

Ben Segal is the author of 78 Stories (No Record Press), co-author of The Wes Letters (Outpost 19), and co-editor of The Official Catalog of the Library of Potential Literature. His short fiction has been published by Tin House (Online), The CollagistGigantic, Puerto del Sol, and many other magazines and journals. He holds an MFA from UCSD, an MA from the European Graduate School and a BA from Hampshire College, and has been a visiting scholar or writer at the University of Pennsylvania, the Haisyakkei residency in Toride, Japan, and Mustarinda House in eastern Finland. He currently lives in Los Angeles.

 

THE LET GO: Available Now! Jerry Gabriel AMA on Reddit /r/books 5/5 @ 5:00 PM EST

Jerry Gabriel’s second collection of short fiction, The Let Go, is now available where our books are sold! To celebrate, Jerry Gabriel will be answering  your questions tonight on /r/books, starting at 5:00 PM EST, under the handle /u/gg676767.  He is a brave man, and we’ll miss him when he departs this Earth for the internet.

The Let Go, by Jerry Gabriel
The Let Go

About The Let Go:

The people who inhabit Jerry Gabriel’s second collection of stories, The Let Go, strain against their historical moments. A poacher’s daughter, a disgraced vet, an out–of–work temp, a professor, a middle–school basketball ace: these are the Great Let Go in whose embattled existence we feel the impact of war, financial crises, and the many lesser perils that attend life. With equal measures of tenderness, ruthlessness, and humor, Gabriel illuminates an Ohio landscape—its cities, suburbs, and countryside—fraught with economic disparity, its characters facing their dilemmas with grief, with anger, but always exhibiting a surprising fortitude. In these seven taut stories, Gabriel writes hardship as a site of hope.

“The characters in Jerry Gabriel’s The Let Go are the most memorable I’ve read in a very long time. They’re war vets and immigrants, ex–cons and small town middle–schoolers, whose lives intertwine in ways both inevitable and unlikely. As they trap mink, repair roofs, harbor fugitives, and try to figure how the hell to run a factory in the basement, they stand in that place—familiar to all of us—where life shifts imperceptibly and something has to give. They cling hard to integrity and do what they have to do.”
—Ana Maria Spagna, author of Test Ride on the Sunnyland Bus

“Like Alice Munro’s stories, these wonderful stories by Jerry Gabriel often have the scope of novels. They take a particular interest in characters who are just barely hanging on and who fear ’the let go’: the day when they will be laid off. The stories have great urgency and momentum and carry you headlong through to the end. The Let Go is one of the best books of short fiction that I’ve read in the last few years.”
—Charles Baxter, author of There’s Something I Want You to Do

“The Let Go is a knife–twister, sharp, sad, sneakily funny. Jerry Gabriel writes with bracing authenticity and insight, but what’s most impressive is how he’s able to chart and deepen the pathos of these unmoored lives without ever marinating in it or succumbing to easy revelations. A terrific collection.”
—Kevin Moffett, author of The Silent History

“An enormous heart pulses through every page, every line of The Let Go, a collection of stories somehow diverse enough to include poachers, roofers, scientists, dropouts, basketball stars, war vets, office workers, and accidental factory owners, all of them full of longing for something they can’t quite name. With his careful attention to their rich interior lives, it’s obvious Jerry Gabriel loves every one of his characters for exactly who they are, and you will too. The Let Go is a work of great literature.”
—Matt Burgess, author of Uncle Janice

“Jerry Gabriel’s wry, fierce stories are about Ohio in the same way Breece Pancake’s stories are about West Virginia, which is to say they tenderly, vividly evoke a singular merciless landscape while also being deeply engaged with the larger world and the politics and history of the United States. In The Let Go, Gabriel elegantly distills the disorders of our perilous times into marvelously strange fiction that is sometimes surreal, often wickedly funny, and profoundly moving. These stories bring us the news that stays news.”
—Maud Casey, author of The Man Who Walked Away

Jerry Gabriel’s first book of fiction, Drowned Boy, was chosen by Andrea Barrett to win the Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction and was published in 2010 by Sarabande Books. It was a Barnes and Noble “Discover Great New Writers” selection and awarded the 2011 Towson Prize for Literature. His stories have recently appeared in Five Chapters, EPOCH, Big Fiction, Alaska Quarterly Review, and The Missouri Review. He lives in Maryland, where he teaches at St. Mary’s College of Maryland and directs the Chesapeake Writers’ Conference.

Find the collection on our catalog , on Amazon, or be one of five lucky winners to get the collection on Goodreads, and enjoy Jerry Gabriel’s profoundly moving collection of (longish) short fiction!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

The Let Go by Jerry Gabriel

The Let Go

by Jerry Gabriel

Giveaway ends May 31, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to Win

FUTURE PERFECT, A Collection by Matt Babcock, Coming to Queen’s Ferry Press October 2016

Queen’s Ferry Press adds 12th title to 2016 new releases.

Plano, TX—April 1, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Matt Babcock’s Future Perfect.

“I feel giddy bordering on euphoric to be making my fiction debut in the early days of my dotage (younger than Defoe but older than Katherine Anne Porter).  And to be doing it among the literary luminaries at Queen’s Ferry Press serves up some seriously savory gravy,” Babcock said.

Future Perfect is the result of twenty years of lunch-hour writing spurts, and it’s immensely gratifying for it to be selected by such a classy, high-quality press as Queen’s Ferry, where stories—sunburned, and brawny, and two-fisted—can bang elbows with readers outside the stuffy cubicles of big-house marketing.”

Future Perfect will release in October, 2016.

About the Author:

Matt Babcock
Matt Babcock

Professor by day and by night a man who goes to bed early, Matthew James Babcock has traipsed around the globe only to return home to Idaho, where he goes owling before sunrise, walks and bikes compulsively, and battles suburbia with his wife, Missy, and their five children.  His fiction has appeared in Dialogue, Wild Violet, Construct, Ampersand Review, The Battered Suitcase, The Rejected Quarterly, Starry Night Review, and White Whale Review.  Press 53 awarded his novella, “He Wanted to Be a Cartoonist for The New Yorker,” first prize in its annual competition.  He holds degrees from Utah State, Binghamton University, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and his scholarship on New England writer, Robert Francis, can be found in The Journal of Ecocriticism and Private Fire: The Ecopoetry and Prose of Robert Francis (University of Delaware Press).  He teaches writing and literature at BYU-Idaho.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

Anthony Varallo, Author of THIS DAY IN HISTORY and OUT LOUD, Adds EVERYONE WAS THERE to 2016 QFP Titles

Queen’s Ferry Press announces the final book of 2016, Anthony Varallo’s collection Everyone Was There.

Plano, TX—March 18, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Anthony Varallo’s collection, Everyone Was There.

“I’ve always admired Queen’s Ferry Press for publishing fiction that is innovative and challenging, yet still has emotional impact, resonance, and a beating heart,” said Varallo. “I hope Everyone Was There fits into that camp, and I feel very lucky to work with such an outstanding press.”

Everyone Was There will release in December, 2016.

About the Author:

Anthony Varallo
Anthony Varallo

Anthony Varallo is the author of This Day in History, winner of the John Simmons Short Fiction Award; Out Loud, winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize; and Think of Me and I’ll Know (TriQuarterly Books/Northwestern University Press). His stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Gettysburg Review, Epoch, New England Review, Harvard Review, and elsewhere. He earned his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and he has received an NEA Fellowship in Literature. Currently he is an associate professor of English at the College of Charleston, where he is the fiction editor of Crazyhorse.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

LESSER AMERICAN BOYS — Zach VandeZande to Publish with QFP in November 2016

Author and dog-lover Zach VandeZande and Queen’s Ferry Press will publish Lesser American Boys in November, 2016.

Plano, TX—March 17, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Zach VandeZande’s collection, Lesser American Boys.

“I’m so jazzed to be joining Queen’s Ferry Press. I’ve long been an admirer of their books, and I’m both very glad and very honored that my book found a home with them,” VandeZande said. “Independent publishing is so vital because it gives us books that are a little more strange, a little riskier, and a little more true than what you often see out of the bigger publishing houses. I hope my book does that tradition proud. I hope it gives my readers something worthwhile, something that makes our being alone in our heads a little less lonely. A little grace in all the madness, or something like that.”

In a recent interview,  he says of the contract–among other good news–“I feel like a real live writer today,” and that it is difficult “not to have a big head about all this.” His story “Accord” appeared in the latest issue of The Adroit Journal.

Lesser American Boys will release in November, 2016.

About the Author:

Zach VandeZande
Zach VandeZande

Zach VandeZande spent too much of his life in Houston, TX, not enough of his life in Denton, TX, and now lives in Carrboro, NC with his girlfriend. He is the author of Apathy and Paying Rent and the co-editor of Critical Pedagogy and Global Literature: Worldly Teaching, and his work has appeared or will soon appear in Portland Review, Passages North, Atlas Review, Gettysburg Review, Cutbank, Thin Air, The Boiler, and elsewhere. He holds a PhD of fiction from the University of North Texas. He likes baking bread, hammocks, and people who bring their dogs.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com