Tag Archives: New Title

Queen’s Ferry Press to Publish Kathleen Hughes’ Second Novel

You Can Walk Home to be published by Queen’s Ferry Press in 2017

Plano, TX—May 12, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Kathleen Hughes’ novel You Can Walk Home.

“I’m so pleased that my second novel, You Can Walk Home, will join the Queen’s Ferry list,” Hughes said.  “Queen’s Ferry is a press of serious and imaginative writers with a commitment to honed, evocative, and purposeful language.  I feel lucky now to join them.”

You Can Walk Home is the story of a family in a small coastal Rhode Island town.  During a fight on a snowy drive home from school one evening, the mother orders her 16-year-old daughter out of the car to walk the last mile.  This punishment does not produce the desired effect.  Told from the perspective of the younger sister, who is in the car that night and is her sister’s confidante, and from the mother, You Can Walk Home is a story about girls and women, parents and children, faith, and how much we can and cannot hold on to the ones we love. You Can Walk Home will release in June, 2017.

About the Author:

Kathleen Hughes
Kathleen Hughes

Kathleen Hughes is the author of Dear Mrs. Lindbergh (WW Norton 2003).  She has won awards from MTV, the New England and Rhode Island Press Associations, the Sewanee Writer’s Conference, and the Vermont Studio Center.  A graduate of Yale University, the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, and the MGH Institute of Health Professions, Hughes is a pediatric nurse practitioner in Rhode Island, where she lives with her family.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

WHEN THINGS WERE GREEN, A Novel by Sion Dayson, to be Published by Queen’s Ferry Press

Sion Dayson novel to be published by Queen’s Ferry Press in 2017

Plano, TX—May 8, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Sion Dayson’s novel When Things Were Green.

“I’m absolutely thrilled to be joining Queen’s Ferry Press. Independent publishers are vital and QFP is such an energetic champion of literary fiction. I am grateful to have found a wonderful home for my first novel,” Dayson said.

When Things Were Green will release in April, 2017.

About the Author:

Sion Dayson
Sion Dayson

Sion Dayson is an American writer living in Paris, France. Her work has appeared in The Writer, The Rumpus, Hunger Mountain, Utne Reader, The Wall Street Journal, Courrier International, Numero Cinq and several anthologies, including Strangers in Paris, among other venues. She’s been a writer-in-residence at the Kerouac House and awarded a grant from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund. Sion holds an MFA in Fiction from Vermont College of Fine Arts and is at work on her second book.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

The Crossing: Issue 3

This one is a little late due to all our announcements in February, but here is the next issue of The Crossing:

newsletter_march
The Crossing

A web-only version of The Crossing will appear each month, and is downloadable in PDF form here. Those who subscribe to receive e-mail updates of The Crossing will receive a promotional code to be used at check-out during the lifespan of each issue.

Mel Bosworth and Ryan Ridge to Co-Author Illustrated Collection

Camouflage Country will stand as Queen’s Ferry Press’ final release of 2015.

Plano, TX—February 27, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish a co-authored collection by Ryan Ridge and Mel Bosworth.

“QFP releases are always the perfect mixture of perfect mixtures: work that’s both evocative and innovative, beautiful and strange,” said Ridge. “To be a part of this party is a privilege and an honor. Let’s dance!”

“I am thrilled!” said Bosworth. “I couldn’t be more pleased and excited to be working with Queen’s Ferry Press. Yes!”

To get an idea of the collection, Camouflage Country, picture Horatio Alger’s greatest nightmares transcribed by the brothers Grimm. Imagine Hemingway’s In Our Time except in our time. See: ‘The Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave’ scream past on a bumper sticker affixed to the back of an F-16. Camouflage Country is one hundred forty-five afterburner blasts of postmodern Americana further fueled by fifty illustrations by the artist Jacob Heustis. Excerpts have appeared in The Santa Monica Review, HobartSleeping Fish, Passages North, McSweeney’s Small Chair, Tin House, Big Lucks, and elsewhere.

Camouflage Country will release in December, 2015.

About the Authors:

Ryan Ridge
Ryan Ridge

Ryan Ridge is the author of the story collection Hunters & Gamblers, the poetry collection Ox, as well as the chapbooks Hey, it’s America and 22nd Century Man. His latest book, American Homes, is out from the University of Michigan Press as part of their new 21st Century Prose series. Past work in PANK, DIAGRAM, Flaunt Magazine, Salt Hill, The Los Angeles Review, The Mississippi Review, Fanzine, and elsewhere. A former editor-in-chief of Faultline, he now edits Juked alongside his wife, Ashley Farmer. He is currently a visiting professor of creative writing at the University of Louisville.

Mel Bosworth
Mel Bosworth

Mel Bosworth is the author of the novel Freight and the poetry chapbook Every Laundromat in the World. His work has appeared in Hayden’s Ferry Review, Per Contra, New World Writing, and Melville House, among others. Mel’s book reviews have appeared in HTMLGIANT, The Lit Pub, and American Book Review. He is the series editor for the Wigleaf Top 50 (2015) and the creator & curator of the Small Press Book Review. Mel lives, breathes, writes, and works in Western Massachusetts.

About the Artist:

Jacob Heustis is a native of Louisville, Kentucky, where he lives and works. In 2004, he had his first solo exhibition at Swanson Reed Contemporary and has shown in numerous group exhibitions and solo shows since. He has also designed album covers for the indie bands Wax Fang, Silver Tongues, and Whistle Peak, among others. His work is held by several public and private collections.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

Queen’s Ferry Press Announces Theodore Wheeler’s “BAD FAITH”

Theodore Wheeler adds the forthcoming collection Bad Faith to Queen’s Ferry Press’ 2016 titles.

Plano, TX—February 12, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Theodore Wheeler’s Bad Faith.

“I’m very excited to have found a great home for my debut collection of stories, particularly one with such acumen regarding the short form,” Wheeler said. “Having a publisher like QFP that focuses on short fiction is a great advantage with what is proving to be a resurgent format. I look forward to working with Erin and the staff on bringing Bad Faith enthusiastically into the world.”

Bad Faith is scheduled to release in July, 2016.

About the Author:

Theodore Wheeler
Theodore Wheeler

Theodore Wheeler’s short fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Best New American Voices, The Southern Review, The Kenyon Review, Boulevard, The Cincinnati Review, and Five Chapters, among others, and received special mention in a Pushcart Prize anthology. His fiction chapbook, On the River, Down Where They Found Willy Brown, was released by Edition Solitude in 2015. A graduate of the Creighton University creative writing program, he’s won the Tarcher/Penguin Top Artist Writing Contest, the Marianne Russo Award from the Key West Literary Seminar, and in 2014 was a fellow at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany. He lives in Omaha with his wife and two daughters, where he is a legal reporter covering the civil courts of Nebraska.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

What Will the Neighbors Think? and Other Fears upon the Eve of Publication

Perception and paranoia from Dina Guidubaldi, author of the forthcoming How Gone We Got:

Names, characters, places, and incidents are products of the author’s imagination, and any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

Recently, at the nth hour, I changed a character’s name in my upcoming collection because I worried it sounded too much like a real-life name of a person I once knew. This self-imposed edit felt wrong somehow—to worry so much that someone might…might what? Take offense? Think I was obsessing about them while they didn’t remember me at all? Accuse me of stalking? I don’t quite know what was behind the name change. Maybe I felt the name was too much—too close to real life, even though the character was honestly (honest!) not.

The main thing fiction has going for it is its lovely lying powers, its deceptive ability. Fiction has, waiting in its wings, bursting at its seams, a host of alien landscapes and evil henchmen and freakish occurrences—why would you avoid that? Why would you not use those fantastic props—all those swords and shit? I don’t get those writers who have a whole blank page in front of them and choose to tell the truth about themselves, to change a name or place here or there and call it fiction. So, was I feeling like one of them—those memoir-masquerading-as-fiction folk? Was that behind the tiny name change, some kind of artistic pride, some kind of guilt over not being fictitious enough?

Similarly, I worry that when this collection comes out, loved (or not-so-loved) ones will suddenly think they’re being written about, in possibly unflattering terms. When you write about a sleazy father, suddenly it’s your sleazy father; when a character has a cheating ex, it’s assumed to be the author’s cheating ex. Again, I blame those memoiry-writers for screwing up the fiction bar, but perhaps I should blame myself, for not making things real-seeming enough? Or wait: fake enough? I’m not sure. But I changed that name, nervous about what someone somewhere might think. And while all the characters in my work are further away than they (hopefully) appear, the “entirely coincidental” part of anyone’s writing is likely untrue.

Stephen King somewhat famously wrote that “fear is at the root of most bad writing,” a quote I quote often, whenever I go around quoting things. Being worried about who’s gonna think what never helps. But that bit of advice opens up a host of other questions: What exactly am I afraid of? Isn’t fear sometimes good? Doesn’t fear keep you from ripping off “The Metamorphosis,” say? Shouldn’t I be worried that I’m writing like an asshole here, in this blog, or over there, in my story collection? Is my protesting too much about my characters being wholly their own simply coming across as protesting too much? As being disingenuous? Or paranoid? Am I paranoid? Seriously, would that person-whose-name-sounds-like-one-of-my-characters’-names even read my book? What’s wrong with me, anyway? Are other writer-people this obsessed with perception? How come Andrew’s blog last week was so much funnier and on-point than mine?

Goddammit.