Tag Archives: Books

ADULTEROUS GENERATION NOW LIVE

I first encountered Amy L. Clark’s writing in A Peculiar Feeling of Restlessness (Rose Metal Press); I’m now thrilled to publish her Adulterous Generation, a collection that “follows young people using what they have to try to create lives for themselves in our still-new century.”

About the book, Christopher Boucher (How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive), says: “Amy Clark’s stories are flash floods, full of moments both poignant and devastating. Step into Adulterous Generation and let the waters rise around you.”

adulterousgeneration_web

The book page is now now live on the Queen’s Ferry site–why not stop by and learn more about this January 2016 title?

FridayReads: On a Book Colliding with the World

This Friday, Zach VandeZande is reading a book well-suited to tin cans. His collection of fiction, Lesser American Boys, is forthcoming from Queen’s Ferry Press in November, 2016.

I like reading heart-wreckers on airplanes. There’s something about the captive space, the recirculated air, the general aura of melancholic resignation inside an airplane cabin that makes reading something deeply human that much more profound.  Everyone on an airplane has a Kafkaesque story of what got them to right where they are, rocketing through the sky at hundreds of miles an hour while (hopefully) trying their best not to fart.  Everyone feels a little self-conscious and silly, and more than a few of them, if they’re like me, feel profoundly alone.

I spent the last week traveling to a wedding and then to a last-minute job interview.  I had two books on my tablet, one for each plane ride that I planned on taking: Nicole Walker’s hybrid eco-crit memoir Quench Your Thirst with Salt, and Abigail Thomas’ What Comes Next and How to Like It.  I’ve been on a nonfiction kick, and both books were excellent.  But that’s not what I’m writing about.

What I’m writing about is this: I found myself headed home on an overnighter after having to book a flight at the last minute (like, I-bought-this-plane-ticket-in-a-bar last minute).  There was nothing left to read on my tablet, and the doors were about to close, and then I remembered that it was Tuesday, and Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me had just come out. I managed to get it bought and downloaded a few minutes before the flight attendants told us to put our stuff into airplane mode.

I am probably not the first to tell you that the book is necessary, an instant classic (and yes, there’s some irony there, given that it arrived on the same day as Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, which by all accounts appears to be a frustrating dud).  The basic structure of the book is a letter to Coates’ son, a response to the boy’s heartbreak on finding out that Mike Brown’s killers would go unpunished.  Coates tells his son of the danger of living in a world that destroys the lives of black people in order to sustain the Dream of its Whiteness, that clings to an ideal of equality without admitting that the bricks of that world are made of the dead bodies of slaves who didn’t ask to die for the glory of this country.  He tells his boy that his body is going to be taken from him, that there’s no stopping its coming. He tells his boy of Prince Jones, a college friend who was killed by a police officer for little reason. He tells his boy a lot of things, and in so doing tells the world of itself. So: a heart-wrecker, through and through.

I read it in one desperate gulp, which is fitting, as the book feels like a long insuck of air after too long underwater. I could leave it at that—an important book, read all at once—except there was a moment of interruption that is worth talking about.  While the book was doing its work on me, a young black woman was sitting to my right.  She seemed about nineteen, and was the kind of self-involved teenager that keeps baby boomers up at night.  She recorded, discarded, and re-recorded a Snapchat to her boyfriend while the plane was taking off and then got rude with the flight attendant about it.  She fidgeted relentlessly in the chair.  She kept getting her bag out and putting it away again, jabbing me in the side in the process.  Most of all, she made me self-conscious about what I was reading, which was a complicated thing to feel, and she got a little nosy in side-eying what I was up to, and then she leaned over and asked me about the book.

I had no idea what to say.  I thought to myself You, Zach VandeZande, who are listening to Vince Staples and reading Ta-Nehisi Coates.  You, the guy who just gave a talk about the possibility of true empathy in art.  This book is about you and your complicity in a violence so grand that you are just now beginning to comprehend it.  Because what was my answer going to be if not that, and what right did I have to give one to her, who I’d been annoyed by and wasn’t interested in connecting with and etc?  In the moment I said, “It’s a letter to his son.  It’s sort of about Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown.”  But that’s no good.  That’s a nothing answer, a half-ass thumbnail blurb for this enormous, grief-stricken thing that Coates was doing to me.

She asked how much I’d read, and I said about 2/3rds.  And she said it must be good then, and she wanted to write it down in her phone to look up later.  So I told her the title.  Looking back, I sort of wish I’d just given it to her, the whole tablet and everything.  I wish I’d had the courage to keep talking to her about it, to say, “Actually, it’s about you and me, and how we’re so far apart from each other, and how I’m not doing enough to close that gap.  How the shit I take for granted about my life came in no small part by people like me standing on your back, and Coates’ back, and soon enough his boy’s.”  But I let her sit there without speaking again and I let her fidget and I grew annoyed by her again until she got off at LAX.  And that’s who I am, and now I’ve gotta live with it.

There’s an old bit of wisdom I like, even though it comes from a terrible punk song by Dillinger Four: “Don’t let your comfort get the best of you.”  That’s what’s happened for white people in this country, and that’s what I hope we wake up from.  In that moment on that airplane I felt indictment, and I think that moments of indictment offer us a choice: we can face it head on and listen, taking the blows we deserve, or we can gather around the people who are like us and echo chamber each other into feeling good again.  I hope that the former happens with Coates’ book.  I’m skeptical that it will, but I hope.

Zach VandeZande
Zach VandeZande

Zach VandeZande spent too much of his life in Houston, TX, not enough of his life in Denton, TX, and now lives in Carrboro, NC with his girlfriend. He is the author of Apathy and Paying Rent and the co-editor of Critical Pedagogy and Global Literature: Worldly Teaching, and his work has appeared or will soon appear in Portland Review, Passages North, Atlas Review, Gettysburg Review, Cutbank, Thin Air, The Boiler, and elsewhere. He holds a PhD of fiction from the University of North Texas. He likes baking bread, hammocks, and people who bring their dogs.

WHEN THINGS WERE GREEN, A Novel by Sion Dayson, to be Published by Queen’s Ferry Press

Sion Dayson novel to be published by Queen’s Ferry Press in 2017

Plano, TX—May 8, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Sion Dayson’s novel When Things Were Green.

“I’m absolutely thrilled to be joining Queen’s Ferry Press. Independent publishers are vital and QFP is such an energetic champion of literary fiction. I am grateful to have found a wonderful home for my first novel,” Dayson said.

When Things Were Green will release in April, 2017.

About the Author:

Sion Dayson
Sion Dayson

Sion Dayson is an American writer living in Paris, France. Her work has appeared in The Writer, The Rumpus, Hunger Mountain, Utne Reader, The Wall Street Journal, Courrier International, Numero Cinq and several anthologies, including Strangers in Paris, among other venues. She’s been a writer-in-residence at the Kerouac House and awarded a grant from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund. Sion holds an MFA in Fiction from Vermont College of Fine Arts and is at work on her second book.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

Anthony Varallo, Author of THIS DAY IN HISTORY and OUT LOUD, Adds EVERYONE WAS THERE to 2016 QFP Titles

Queen’s Ferry Press announces the final book of 2016, Anthony Varallo’s collection Everyone Was There.

Plano, TX—March 18, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Anthony Varallo’s collection, Everyone Was There.

“I’ve always admired Queen’s Ferry Press for publishing fiction that is innovative and challenging, yet still has emotional impact, resonance, and a beating heart,” said Varallo. “I hope Everyone Was There fits into that camp, and I feel very lucky to work with such an outstanding press.”

Everyone Was There will release in December, 2016.

About the Author:

Anthony Varallo
Anthony Varallo

Anthony Varallo is the author of This Day in History, winner of the John Simmons Short Fiction Award; Out Loud, winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize; and Think of Me and I’ll Know (TriQuarterly Books/Northwestern University Press). His stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Gettysburg Review, Epoch, New England Review, Harvard Review, and elsewhere. He earned his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and he has received an NEA Fellowship in Literature. Currently he is an associate professor of English at the College of Charleston, where he is the fiction editor of Crazyhorse.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

LESSER AMERICAN BOYS — Zach VandeZande to Publish with QFP in November 2016

Author and dog-lover Zach VandeZande and Queen’s Ferry Press will publish Lesser American Boys in November, 2016.

Plano, TX—March 17, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Zach VandeZande’s collection, Lesser American Boys.

“I’m so jazzed to be joining Queen’s Ferry Press. I’ve long been an admirer of their books, and I’m both very glad and very honored that my book found a home with them,” VandeZande said. “Independent publishing is so vital because it gives us books that are a little more strange, a little riskier, and a little more true than what you often see out of the bigger publishing houses. I hope my book does that tradition proud. I hope it gives my readers something worthwhile, something that makes our being alone in our heads a little less lonely. A little grace in all the madness, or something like that.”

In a recent interview,  he says of the contract–among other good news–“I feel like a real live writer today,” and that it is difficult “not to have a big head about all this.” His story “Accord” appeared in the latest issue of The Adroit Journal.

Lesser American Boys will release in November, 2016.

About the Author:

Zach VandeZande
Zach VandeZande

Zach VandeZande spent too much of his life in Houston, TX, not enough of his life in Denton, TX, and now lives in Carrboro, NC with his girlfriend. He is the author of Apathy and Paying Rent and the co-editor of Critical Pedagogy and Global Literature: Worldly Teaching, and his work has appeared or will soon appear in Portland Review, Passages North, Atlas Review, Gettysburg Review, Cutbank, Thin Air, The Boiler, and elsewhere. He holds a PhD of fiction from the University of North Texas. He likes baking bread, hammocks, and people who bring their dogs.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

QFP Adds Collection by Chauna Craig to 2016 Titles

The Widow’s Guide to Edible Mushrooms is the latest addition to forthcoming Queen’s Ferry Press Titles.

Edit: An earlier draft of this release incorrectly contained the lead from our previous announcement concerning Jen Michalski’s novel. My apologies to both Mss. Craig and Michalski for the mistake.

Plano, TX—February 20, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish Chauna Craig’s The Widow’s Guide to Edible MushroomsStories

About the announcement, Craig said “I’m thrilled to be part of an independent press that believes contemporary literature is alive and well and demonstrates that from its vibrant, active website to every loving detail of book editing and design. I feel lucky to be on board with the Queens Ferry community.”

The collection will release in September of 2016.

About the Author:

Chauna Craig
Chauna Craig

Chauna Craig’s stories have appeared in Prairie Schooner, GreenMountains Review, Quarterly West, Seattle Review, Smokelong Quarterly, and elsewhere.  Her fiction awards include descant’s Sandra Brown Short Fiction prize, the Mari Sandoz/Prairie Schooner Award in Fiction, and Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize anthology. She has also received fellowships from the Vermont Studio Center, Hedgebrook, and the Heinz Foundation and a scholarship to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.  She teaches creative writing at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

Berit Ellingsen: After BENEATH THE LIQUID SKIN

firthFORTH author of Beneath The Liquid Skin, Berit Ellingsen, updates us on her most recent activity: from essays on gaming to the empty, frigid arctic, Ellingsen has continued to show both the range and precision displayed in her 2012 collection.

After Beneath the Liquid Skin came out, French author François Bon translated my novel The Empty City to French. The novel came out in French as Une ville vide in the summer of 2013, published by Publiemonde and Publienet.

In 2013 I wrote a novel with the working title Landscapes, Fragments (an excerpt, “Grains of Sand” is here). It’s a story about climate change and personal agency, and has been picked up by an American publisher. But I can’t say more about it before they make it official. I am, however, over the moon to see the novel come out, because it’s about issues that are very dear to me.

I completed the revisions of Landscapes Fragments, then began on a follow-up in early 2014, because there seemed to be more to the story. That novel is not fully revised yet, but close.

Last year I also wrote two essays for British lit mag Litro’s blog, one about a visit to the world’s northernmost abandoned town, and one about computer games and architecture. Both pieces were really fun to write and a nice change of pace after two novels in a row.

Those essays inspired a series of memoiristic fiction/hybrid genre-linked essays about gaming, games, people, and memory, one of which was published in Entropy Magazine. The essay series is currently in slush and may be expanded.

In 2014 I also completed some short stories, but fewer than the years before. One is scheduled to come out in Black Candies’ anthology Surveillance, edited by Ryan Bradford. The TOC for the anthology hasn’t been published yet, but previous Black Candies have included stories by Aaron Burch, Sarah Rose Etter, Zack Wentz etc.

Another of my more science-fiction’y stories, “Dancing on the Red Planet”, which was first published in the anthology Rocket Science, edited by Ian Sales, and nominated for the British Science Fiction Award in 2012, was reprinted in the anthology World SF 3, edited by Lavie Tidhar. This anthology was chosen as one of NPR’s Best Books of 2014, which was fantastic!

This coming spring my flash story about Cold War spies, “Sovetskoye Shampanskoye”, will be reprinted in W.W. Norton’s Flash Fiction International, which has an amazing line-up that includes Nobel laureate Czeslav Milosz, Kim Young-ha, and Ethel Rohan.

Another short story, “Boyfriend and Shark”, first published in Paul Jessup’s Coffinmouth, will be reprinted in The Humanity of Monsters, edited by Michael Matheson. This anthology features stories by well-known SFF writers such as Peter Watts, Yoon Ha Lee, Indrapramit Das, etc.

I also have in slush a long essay about last summer’s trip to the Arctic and am also working on a few short stories. My short stories since Beneath the Liquid Skin have had an apocalyptic theme to them, so that may be the foundation for a future collection. I would also like to explore the boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, and memoir and ekphrasis further.

But first and foremost, my new novel is out this year, and release details will be public as soon as they’re ready.

Berit EllingsenBerit Ellingsen is a Korean-Norwegian writer whose stories have appeared or will appear in SmokeLong Quarterly, elimae, Metazen, decomP, Unstuck, and other literary journals. Her novel, The Empty City, is a story about silence. Berit’s short story collection, Beneath the Liquid Skin, was published by firthFORTH Books in November 2012. That year one of her stories was nominated for the Pushcart Prize and another for the British Science Fiction Award. Find out more at beritellingsen.com.

Fiction Writer and Playwright James Magruder Joins Queen’s Ferry Press

James Magruder to release a new book with Queen’s Ferry Press in 2016 

Plano, TX—January 16, 2015 Queen’s Ferry Press, an independent publisher providing a venue for fine literary fiction, announced it will publish a new book–titled Love Slaves of Helen Hadley Hall–by author James Magruder.

“James Magruder’s Let Me See It (Triquarterly Books) was among the best books I read during 2014—and the collection that haunted me as the one that got away,” says Founding Editor & Publisher, Erin McKnight. “James Magruder’s writing is as sublime as I remember, his empathy as elegant…and this one’s also funny. Really, really funny.”

“Part of me feels I can die happy knowing that Love Slaves is between two covers,” says Magruder. “I started writing it before I knew what I was doing. I love it more than my two published books.”

Love Slaves of Helen Hadley Hall will release in late spring 2016.

About the Author:

James Magruder
James Magruder

James Magruder’s adaptations of works by Molière, Marivaux, Lesage, Labiche, Gozzi, Dickens, Hofmannsthal, and Giraudoux have been staged on and off-Broadway, across the country, and in Germany and Japan. His stories have appeared in The Gettysburg Review, New England Review, Subtropics, Bloom, The Normal School, New Stories from the Midwest, and elsewhere. His début novel, Sugarless, was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award and shortlisted for the 2010 William Saroyan International Writing Prize. His collection of stories, Let Me See It, was published by TriQuarterly Books/Northwestern University Press in 2014. He is a four-time fellow of the MacDowell Colony and his writing has also been supported by the Kenyon Playwrights Conference and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, where he was a Walter E. Dakin Fellow in Fiction. He lives in Baltimore and teaches dramaturgy at Swarthmore College.

Founded in 2011 as an independent publisher, Queen’s Ferry Press specializes in literary fiction. The press currently releases 6–12 titles a year, many from debut authors, and is the publisher of Shadows of Men, the 2013 recipient of the TIL Steven Turner Award for Best Work of First Fiction. For book updates please contact Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity of Queen’s Ferry Press, or visit www.queensferrypress.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Kevin Wehmueller, Marketing & Publicity

kwehmueller@queensferrypress.com

The Best Small Fictions: Update

This Friday marks the international nominations deadline for The Best Small Fictions of 2015.

The Best Small Fictions NominationsOver 100 nominations have been received to date, though we expect a great deal more before the final, US deadline, January 23rd.

International nominations have come in from Japan, Australia, Cyprus, The Netherlands, India, Canada and the UK.

We’re very pleased with the response from editors so far, but please submit your nominations and–if you haven’t yet–announce them to your readers! Show your support for this long overdue compilation the best of the smallest fiction available!

 

CRUDE SKETCHES DONE IN QUICK SUCCESSION: Now Available (with more snakes)!

We’re thrilled to announce the official pre-release of Andrew Brininstool’s debut collection, Crude Sketches Done In Quick Succession. To celebrate, we’ve asked Andrew to tell two truths and a lie a lie about the stories, the book, and apparently some of his questionable choices involving tequila:

Two Truths and a Lie

  1. Gordon’s invention came to me in a dream.

I don’t put much stock in dreams, but Gordon and his invention came to me in the minutes before I awoke. He spoke to me of Daily Constitutionals, a technologically advanced potty-training seat that teaches little ones the Bill of Rights. I want to say Gordon spoke to me about this without sounding like I am a psychopath. That afternoon, I sat down and began “Young Arsonists in Love.”

  1. I got on the wrong side of a shaman once.

If you know anything about me, you know I have two enormous passions: travel, and rock climbing. For my sixty-eighth birthday, a colleague, M___ and I climbed the Andes Mountains. What with M___ and I having years of experience beneath our belts, we chose to forego guides. And didn’t we both have egg on our faces when, on the fourth day of our climb, an enormous blizzard wrapped all of the highlands of Ecuador in snow! With some luck, we captured and cleaned a tapir, and feasted on its haunches for three days, burrowed inside a cave while the storm refused to pass. Once it did pass and the sun came out, silly me, I slipped on a rock and severely tweaked my knee. Not so bad, perhaps, except that we were dangerously low on supplies and tapir, come to find out, does not agree with me. With grace and much compassion, M___ carried me to Illuman, a town known for the curandero. Even as the doctor asked me to strip to my boxers—even as he smoked what May Have Been Weed But Did Not Smell Like Weed At All and played with a little bell—I knew I was on a spiritual journey. I was changing.

And then the dude started spitting tequila in my face.

  1. Among all the lovely people who have helped me or encouraged me or loved me or the like, I’ve also added a major shout-out to KTCK 1310 AM The Ticket in Dallas, for when I am not writing I am keeping my ears listening.

Ragonk.

***Make sure you message @abrininstool with your order confirmation to receive a personalized bad poem! Use it to your heart’s content, but make sure you tweet your photo back at us.***

Now, behold, as Queen’s Ferry Press’ Marketing & Publicity, Kevin Wehmueller, turns a bad poem into an even worse origami snake:

You ordered Crude Sketches Done In Quick Succession. You got a bad poem in the mail. What should you do with it, you ask? You should probably frame it, but making an origami snake out of “What’s At Stake” comes in at a close second.

First, take your poem:

My god, this is awful.
My god, this is awful.

You’ll need a square sheet of paper, so cut that bad boy down to size:

Maybe I should have torn along the poem.
Maybe I should have torn along the poem.

Flip it over and fold diagonally:

Out of sight, out of mind.
Out of sight, out of mind.

Fold the other corners to the center line:

Answer: your dignity.
Answer: your dignity.

Repeat:

Blergh. It's back.
Blergh. It’s back.

Repeat one more time:

Much better.
Much better.

By now, you shouldn’t be able to read the poem, which is a huge improvement. Fold your progress in half:

This could pass as a snake, I guess.
This could pass as a snake, I guess.

From the wide end, fold up enough to make the head of your snake:

Ceci n'est pas une pipe.
Ceci n’est pas une pipe.

Next, do a reverse inside fold:

Not entirely sure what that means, but this is what it ended up looking like.
Not entirely sure what that means, but this is what it ended up looking like.

Fold the head down on one side:

This is starting to look pretty bad.
This is starting to look pretty bad.

And again, reverse inside fold:

Seriously, I have no idea what reverse inside fold means.
Seriously, I have no idea what reverse inside fold means.

Theoretically you now have a snake. If it looks anything like mine at this point, congratulations. You also have the dexterity of a six year-old. But we’re not done, because we’re going to make this baby slither. Repeat the process of fold, reverse inside fold (seriously what the hell does this mean?) three to four times along the spine:

I should really clean this desk.
I should really clean this desk.
Crude pictures posted in quick succession (because I got tired of writing directions).
Crude pictures posted in quick succession (because I got tired of writing directions).
Just one more and...
Just one more and…
Finished!
Finished!

Well, well, well, look at that. Is it a snake, or a stake? Are they really so different? Not when I make them. Congratulations! Now go read Crude Sketches Done In Quick Succession.

Snake or stake? Or steak? Or Keats? "Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public."
Snake or stake? Or steak? Or Keats? “Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public.”